Strategy to Execution – Hoshin Kanri

November 11th, 2017 No comments
Reading Time: 3 minutes

I can’t believe it’s been 7 weeks since moving to ServiceNow and the Inspire team. In this time I feel like I’ve gone from knowing everything and being absolutely confident in what I’m doing to clear signs of the Imposter Syndrome showing. As one of my old colleagues reminds me, this is normal.

In these last few weeks I’ve been learning, and re learning, a lot of the things I used to do and scratching in the deep dark recesses of my brain for those nuggets of knowledge. So rather than do this aimlessly I thought I’d start putting some of these ideas down here.

My new role has me helping clients with taking their Strategy and mapping it through to clear objectives and measurable outcomes. One of the challenges is finding different ways to help clients see this and then be able to continue to develop this on their own.

Today I was looking at Hoshin Kanri and the 7 step planning cycle.

Hoshin Kanri is a policy management process that attempts to link the corporate strategic direction with the measures, goals and actions of those doing the work.  Or more simply, get everyone pointed in the same direction.

The 7 steps are:

  1. Establish Organisational Vision
  2. Develop strategic plan (3-5 year)
  3. Develop annual objectives
  4. Deploy objectives
  5. Implement
  6. Regular reviews of progress
  7. Annual Review

These steps are good, and there are some very detailed templates and matrices out there if you need them, but I found it easier to look at it from the simplified approach of the idea of the flow from vision through to measurable actions. Mapping the Vision to Objectives (these essentially being Business Drivers) which set the Goals (being the Outcomes you wish to achieve) that drive Actions (that need to be measurable).

 

My crude attempt to illustrate this is to show that there is clear ownership of Vision by Senior executives and together they work with middle management to create the Objectives (and define the Business Drivers) and finally middle management take those Objectives and work with their teams to develop specific measurable Actions; based on the agreed Goals and Outcomes that the teams execute on.

A lot of the time, this doesn’t happen. I’ve worked in many businesses where no one knew what the corporate vision was, let alone there being clearly communicated objectives, goals and measures.

The final piece of the puzzle is measuring these Actions regularly and adjusting the objectives, goals and actions as necessarily.

So to summarise:

  1. Develop Strategic Objectives and Goals based on Vision
  2. Get consensus of the objectives, goals and actions
  3. Implement what’s been agreed
  4. Measure it constantly (and review those measurements)
  5. Adjust accordingly.

This may seem basic and straight forward, but implementing it in a meaningful way, with good thought, and actually measuring it is hard, especially if the processes are manual and are not being reported back effectively in a timely manner… But that’s a post for another time.

 

Of moving on and getting things done.

September 30th, 2017 No comments
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It’s been some time since I’ve posted here. And I had all the intent in the world of getting back into things, but life doesn’t always let you do these things. But to bring all those spam-bots up to speed, things have changed.

To help facilitate a new start and a new perspective I’ve made the leap out of Big Blue and the world of leading “mega deals”, contract negotiations and generally herding cats, and joined ServiceNow’s Inspire team. I’ve been a fan of ServiceNow for some time now and this is a fantastic opportunity to work in a group of  ex-CxOs, senior consultants and industry experts; with the sole purpose to help ServiceNow’s lighthouse customers succeed.

Looking forwarding to getting that need to post idea’s back…. Here’s hoping.

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Oh No!

April 21st, 2017 Comments off
Reading Time: 1
image by Tom Woodward

image by Tom Woodward

I only recently realised that it’s been over a year since I posted anything here.

Sad I know.

The last 18 months have been a little hectic with moving from one company to another, and refocusing on being a husband and a father rather than on a career and living out of a suitcase.

That said there are some exciting things in the works, one of which is a book. Whilst there isn’t a lot to say about it yet, it will be based on a couple of things, Wardley Mapping and Outsourcing. I’ll also add that my co-writers and I will bring rather unique “insiders” perspective to the process; we might even start to release some drafts here.

Molly Crabapple’s 15 rules for creative success in…

November 5th, 2015 Comments off
Reading Time: 4 minutes
selfportrait_highres1

image of Molly Crabapples self portrait

I found these great rules for creative success from Molly Crabapple via Richard Kadrey’s tumbler. I think a lot of these apply to most industries… I’ve a few favourites #6 and #8 are most relevant

 

 

1. The number one thing that would let more independent artists exists in America is a universal basic income. The number one thing that has a possibility of happening is single payer healthcare. This is because artists are humans who need to eat and live and get medical care, and our country punishes anyone who wants to go freelance and pursue their dream by telling them they might get cancer while uninsured, and then not be able to afford to treat it.

2. Companies are not loyal to you. Please never believe a company has your back. They are amoral by design and will discard you at a moment’s notice. Negotiate aggressively, ask other freelancers what they’re getting paid, and don’t buy into the financial negging of some suit.

3. I’ve cobbled together many different streams of income, so that if the bottom falls out of one industry, I’m not ruined. My mom worked in packaging design. When computers fundamentally changed the field, she lost all her work. I learned from this.

4. Very often people who blow up and become famous fast already have some other sort of income, either parental money, spousal money, money saved from another job, or corporate backing behind the scenes. Other times they’ve actually been working for 10 years and no one noticed until suddenly they passed some threshold. Either way, its good to take a hard look- you’ll learn from studying both types of people, and it will keep you from delusional myth-making.

5. I’ve never had a big break. I’ve just had tiny cracks in this wall of indifference until finally the wall wasn’t there any more

6. Don’t be a dick. Be nice to everyone who is also not a dick, help people who don’t have the advantages you do, and never succumb to crabs in the barrel infighting.

7. Remember that most people who try to be artists are kind of lazy. Just by busting your ass, you’re probably good enough to put yourself forward, so why not try?

8. Rejection is inevitable. Let it hit you hard for a moment, feel the hurt, and then move on.

9. Never trust some Silicon Valley douchebag who’s flush with investors’ money, but telling creators to post on their platform for free or for potential crumbs of cash. They’re just using you to build their own thing, and they’ll discard you when they sell the company a few years later.

10. Be a mercenary towards people with money. Be generous and giving to good people without it.

11. Working for free is only worth it if its with fellow artists or grassroots organizations you believe in, and only if they treat your respectfully and you get creative control.

12. Don’t ever submit to contests where you have to do new work. They’ll just waste your time, and again, only build the profile of the judges and the sponsoring company. Do not believe their lies about “exposure”. There is so much content online that just having your work posted in some massive image gallery is not exposure at all.

13. Don’t work for free for rich people. Seriously. Don’t don’t don’t. Even if you can afford to, you’re fucking over the labor market for other creators. Haggling hard for money is actually a beneficial act for other freelancers, because it is a fight against the race to the bottom that’s happening online.

14. If people love your work, treat them nice as long as they’re nice to you.

15. Be massively idealistic about your art, dream big, open your heart and let the blood pour forth. Be utterly cynical about the business around your art.

Finally…

The Internet will not save creators.

Social media will not save us. Companies will not save us. Crowd-funding will not save us. Grants will not save us. Patrons will not save us.

Nothing will save us but ourselves and each other.

Now make some beautiful things.

-Molly Crabapple

IT outsourcing Frameworks – Part 3

October 30th, 2015 Comments off
Reading Time: 6 minutes

In Part 1 and Part 2 I looked at reasons why outsourcing fails and what to consider when looking to outsource. In this last instalment I look at recommendations for structure and framework.

 

Part 3 Recommendations

 

Is important to understand that IT should not be treated as a single amorphous blob (BANNISTER, F and Remenyi, D, 2005). To successfully structure, and then manage, an outsourcing contract in such a way that provides for flexibility in delivery model and successful ability to backsource functions as needed the following model should be employed.

A mixed methodology approach (ALEXANDROVA, 2015; MCKEEN, J D and Smith, H A, 2015; LACITY and Willcocks, 2000) allows the contract and service flexibility. A clear framework for contracting and delivery of services (CHOU and Chou, 2009) and strong governance and leadership (MCKEEN, J D and Smith, H A, 2015; GARTNER, 2008)

 

 

Contracting Flexibility

Having used the models and techniques identified in this report, like-services should be grouped into towers or tranches the contracting. Each of these tranches would take into account the relative maturity of the IT service on the continuum as identified above the organisational needs and desires to attain hi operational maturity and a clear understanding of the service and deliverables. The releasing of the outsourcing in tranches or stages would allow the organisation to test IT outsourcing, building their own maturity in outsourcing and contracting and testing their vendor.

Each Group of services would utilise various contracting methods depending upon the relative maturity of that service and the needs of the organisation. This would create a flexible contracting model, combining fee-for-service, strategic partnerships and buy-in contracting models; as depicted in Figure 4.

Tranches- model

Figure 4 Grouping by contracting model

Intellectual property and Knowledge management would be clearly defined not only as a deliverable as part of the IT outsourcing contract, but a deliverable as part of any backsourcing of services (KIEN et al., 2010; LACITY and Willcocks, 2000; MCKEEN, J D and Smith, H A, 2015). The IP and KM aspects would pertain to the processes tools and techniques needed to run the IT operation. This could be delivered in the form of a concept of operations (CONOPS) document specifically detailing those processes and functions needed to deliver IT services (MBAX9106 – ISM, 2015). This may require some contract negotiation around one time perpetual use of the vendor IP if it has become integral to the delivery of the IT service.

This would be delivered as clear termination clauses, detailed documentation during outsourcing, detailed transition plan, and HR considerations (VELTRI et al., 2008).

 

Governance Framework

The government framework employed needs to be made of multiple parts this includes an overarching governance model, that dictates common components of the engagement; a contract management component, that allows for the management of the individual towers and tranches; and the individual measures.

Measures will comprise of both common measures and deliverables along with tower specific ones. Figure 5 shows a common measures and deliverables. These include those outlined previously, including any knowledge management or IP retention deliverables and specific tower measures and deliverables applying only the specific SLA and the KPIs needed.

measures - model

Figure 5 Measures and Deliverables

 

The resulting governance framework can be found in Figure 6. This provides a flexible and agile IT outsourcing model that supports the business with its current and future needs.

 

Assignment2 - model

Figure 6 ITO Governance and contract structure

 

Whilst this looks relatively simple, it is, contractually speak, fairly complex and requires that all parties (client and vendor) understand the purpose of each engagement and the visions an goals of the client organisation. This is possible, using the governance engagement model to socialise and communicate the necessary strategy components to provide the appropriate context and direction to vendors and the business alike.

 

References

ALEXANDROVA. 2015. Risk Factors in IT Outsourcing Partnerships: Vendors’ Perspective. Global Business Review. Vol 16 iss 5, pp.747-759.

BAHLIA and RIVARD. 2005. Validating measures of information technology outsourcing risk factors. The international Journal of Management Science. Omega(33), pp.175-187.

BANNISTER, F and D REMENYI. 2005. Why IT Continues to Matter: Reflection on the Strategic Valie of IT. The Electronic Journal Information Systems Evaluation. Vol 8 iss 3, pp.159-168.

BARKER, J R. 1993. Tightening the Iron Cage: Concertive control in self-managed teams. Administrative Science Quarterly. Iss 38, pp.408-437.

BENAROCH, JEFFERY, KAUFFMAN, and SHAH. 2007. Option-Based Risk Management: A Field Study of Sequential Information Technology Investment Decisions. Journal of Management Information Systems. Vol 24 iss 2, pp.103-140.

CARR, NG. 2003. IT Doesn’t Matter. Harvard Business Review. Vol 81 Iss 5, pp.41-49.

CARR. 2004. Does IT Matter. Harvard Business School Press.

CHOU and CHOU. 2009. Information systems outsourcing life cycle and risks analysis. Computer Standards & Interfaces. 2009. Iss 31, p.1036–1043.

CIOINSIGHT. 2012. BYOD Sends Mobile Device Management Costs Soaring. CIO Magazine, 7 November, p.1.

CROMAR. 2014. From Techie to Boss: Transitioning to Leadership. APRESS.

GARTNER. 2008. Gartner IT Infrastructure and Operations Maturity Model.

ISACA. 2012. Cobit 5 – A Business Framework for the Governance and Management of Enterprise IT. Information Systems Audit and Control Foundation.

KAISER and BUXMANN. 2012. Toward a Dynamic View on Client Dependence in IS Outsourcing Relationships: A Qualitative System Dynamics Approach. In: Systems Dynacmics Conference. St. Gallen.

KIEN, KIAT, and PELLY. 2010. Switching it OutSOurcing SupplierS: enhancing tranSitiOn readineSS. MIS Quartely Executive, March, pp.23-33.

KRIEGER. 2015. Service Management in an as-a-service world., July, pp.8-9.

KRONAWITTER, WENTZEL, and PAPADAKI. 2013. IT Application Outsourcing in Europe: Long-term Outcomes, Success Factors and Implications for ITO Maturity. In: 46th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. IEEE Computer Society, pp.4456-4465.

LACITY, KHAN, and WILLCOCKS. 2009. A review of the IT outsourcing literature: Insights for practice. Journal of Strategic Information Systems., p.130–146.

LACITY and WILLCOCKS. 2000. “An Empirical Investigation of Information Technology Sourcing Practices: Lessons from Experience. MIS Quarterly, p.363–408.

MBAX9106 – ISM. 2015. Information Systems Management – Semester 2. Sydney: University of New South Wales.

MCKEEN, J D and H A SMITH. 2015. IT Strategy: Issues and Practices. NJ: Pearson.

MIYAGI, MONDEN, AZUMA et al. 2014. Align Business Initiatives and IT Solutions: Collaboration Is Critical for Effective IT Governance. ISACA quarterly.

TAPPER, O’BRIAN, DIALANI, and MARSTON. 2014. From Traditional to Cloud-Based Outsourced/Managed Services: Optimal Business Models for Multiprovider Management in Delivering Business Process and Application Services.

VELTRI, SAUNDERS, and KAVAN. 2008. Information Systems Backsourcing: Correcting Problems and Responding to Opportunities. California Management Review. 51(1), pp.50-76.

WARDLEY. 2014. A quick route to building a strategy. [online]. [Accessed 15 August 2015]. Available from World Wide Web: “http://blog.gardeviance.org/2014/07/a-quick-route-to-building-strategy.html”

WARDLEY. 2015. An introduction to Wardley (Value Chain) Mapping. [online]. [Accessed 6 October 2015]. Available from World Wide Web: “http://blog.gardeviance.org/2015/02/an-introduction-to-wardley-value-chain.html

WARDLEY. 2015. Position, Flow and Movement. [online]. [Accessed 10 October 2015]. Available from World Wide Web: “http://blog.gardeviance.org/2015/06/position-flow-and-movement.html

WILLCOCKS, LACITY, and KERN. 1999. Risk mitigation in IT outsourcing strategy revisited: longitudinal case research at LISA. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems. Vol 8 Iss 3, p.285–314.